Review – Earth Runners Circadian

Written By Barefoot Dawsy

EarthRunners_logoA couple of weeks ago, I very excitedly opened up a package containing my first pair of Earth Runners sandals. Since hearing about Earth Runners last year, I’ve wanted to try out a pair and see if all the fuss was merited. Lucky me, got to try out a pair of the brand new Circadian sandals, which are being launched this year.

For those of you who haven’t heard of them, Earth Runners is a company that got its start hand-making sandals, using funding from Kickstarer.

They make lovely sandals that are designed with the concept of Earthing in mind. What this means is that they contain features that help you feel connected to the ground, in a similar way to how you would when walking and running completely barefoot.

Construction

Custom-molded-600x450The model that I tried out is called the Circadian, and features a thin, but tough, 6mm Vibram sole, with a tread comprised of dozens of small, circular bumps.

The strapping system is very simple, and comprises a single piece of material (nylon?) and a sturdy plastic cinch for tightening and loosening.

Joining the uppers and lowers are several metal rivets, which not only create a firm connection between the materials, but are also an integral part of the earthing experience (they are electrically conductive).

Aesthetics

circadian-sandals2I like the way these sandals look. It’s as simple as that. The durable materials give a substantial appearance to these sandals, yet they strap so nicely to the contours of your feet that they look like they truly belong there.

In a lot of ways, they remind me of Luna sandals, which are one of the most popular running sandals out there, yet they are a little bit simpler in design, which gives them a slightly more traditional look.

Performance

I’ve spent quite a bit of time in my new Cicadians now, and am pleased to report that they get more comfortable by the day. The footbed, which at first seemed a little bit stiff, has softened somewhat, but has retained its overall shape and strength.

Earth Runners have struck an excellent balance between keeping the weight of the Circadians down, while also providing ample stiffness to the sole to enable good running performance over a variety of terrains.

I’ve worn my pair on roads, footpaths, trails and fields, and so far I’m very happy with their performance.

If there is one drawback that comes to mind, it’s that when I first started wearing them, these sandals were a little bit slippery. The new rubber of the sole, and even the rivets did tend to make things a bit slippery underfoot in wet weather. The amount of slippage seems to be reducing as I rough up the soles a bit, and I hardly notice any slipping now after 3-4 weeks of wear. An interesting side-note to this is is that it has led to me improving the way that I step, to give me a more solid base.

Conclusion

All-in-all, I really enjoy the new Circadians. I love that they are produced by a small company that has cleverly used crowd-sourced funding to produce a shoe that rivals some of the major players.

I’d love to be able to go into more depth about earthing and how these shoes work in this regards, but I just haven’t got the vocabulary or familiarity with this subject to be able to discuss it properly. I’d, however, highly recommend getting in touch with Earth Runners, or checking out their website, and/or YouTube videos, as they have a wealth of knowledge in this area.

Beginning Barefoot would like to thank Earth Runners for providing shoes for testing. Please support them by visiting their website and seeing if a pair of their sandals is right for you.

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2 Responses to Review – Earth Runners Circadian

  1. evilcyber says:

    I just checked their website and with the extras these cost nearly $100 – a bit expensive for what is essentially a piece of rubber, don’t you think?

    • It’s a bit steep, but they are nicely crafted, and hold up well to wear-and tear. With the exception of Xeroshoes, the $100 marks seems to be fast becoming the average price for ‘running’ sandals…I suppose it’s the price you pay for hand-crafting done outside a sweatshop these days!

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