HIIT vs LISS: Guest Post By Douglass Hameldon

This is a guest post by Douglass Hameldon of FitnessPurity

Physical exercises is a major priority to any athlete. Also, it has proven to be more useful
even to the regular person. Basically, anyone that wants to stay fit and healthy will be recommended to engage in proper workouts. Speaking of workouts, they are grouped into different categories. Cardio exercises are one of the most popular forms of workouts. They are aimed at increasing the heart rate, which then has an effect on the fat loss.

For an effective workout experience, you should combine calisthenics and cardio. Calisthenics utilizes the body muscles and strength while cardio increases the heart rate. A combination of the two will mean that you’ll burn fat and gain/retain muscles as well.

Cardio exercises are normally categorized into two; High-Intensity Interval Training {HIIT} and Low-Intensity Steady State {LISS}. This article will go deep in these two types of cardio.

Low-Intensity Steady State (LISS)

LISS is a cardio exercise that is aimed at increasing the heart rate by around 50 to 65% of the maximum rate. It is performed for a long time, usually between 30 and 60 minutes, at a pace that allows you to breathe with ease. With LISS, it uses more of the stored body fat instead of the stored glucose {muscle glycogen}.

 

Examples Of LISS Workouts

 

Typically, Low-Intensity Steady State exercises are

 

easy to do. They include swimming, walking, cycling, or when you are jogging at a slow pace. As long as the workout you are doing doesn’t make your heart rate to increase beyond 65%, it is considered a LISS exercise.

The Advantages

 

  • They are easier for overweight and sedentary persons
  • They offer active recovery of the body and muscles
  • They use more fat to generate energy, instead of glycogen
  • They are easy on tendons, ligaments, and joints
  • They are also easy on the muscular and central nervous system
  • They are flexible and easily integrated into the regular workout schedule

 

The Drawbacks

  • Fewer calories are burnt after a workout {they are not too intense}
  • The workouts sessions tend to be long and tiresome {might even be boring at some point}
  • It affects the metabolic rate since the body will be adapted easily to the Low-Intensity Steady State.

High-Intensity Interval Training – HIIT

Contrary to LISS, HIIT is all about engaging in a blend of short, intense workouts that range between 10 to 60 seconds. They aim at increasing the heart rate by about 80% to 95 % of the maximum rate. One major difference between LISS and HIIT is that HIIT combines LISS in its workouts. During the rest periods, you can rest completely or opt for low intensive workouts between the intervals.

 

Examples of HIIT

The High-Intensity Interval Training workouts are not specific or limited to a certain form. It is all about starting light and finishing with a high intense exercise. Remember that it is aimed at boosting your heart rate to almost 95% of the maximum rate. Ideally, you can start by jogging for around three minutes, but not in an overly intense pace. After that, perform intense cycling or sprinting for 20 seconds, followed by a 40-second recovery light jogging. When the heart rate has slowed down, jump right into a three-minute low-intensity workout.

Other forms of HIIT include mountain climbing, jumping jacks, or burpees. Remember not to take brakes in the process.

 

The Advantages

  • It has a better impact on the metabolic system {it increases the metabolic rate}
  • More calories are burnt after a workout
  • The exercises are enjoyable since they are quick and take less than a minute.
  • It promotes anaerobic and aerobic workout capacity
  • Calories are burnt during and after workouts
  • It promotes the preservation of lean muscles

The Drawbacks

  • They have a higher injury risk
  • The muscular system and CNS are overwhelmed
  • The exercises require both physical and psychological efforts
  • They are not suitable for overweight or persons with health issues.
  • These exercises might need some experience and skills

 

The Verdict

Both cardio workouts are ideal for burning the excess fat in the body. Nonetheless, LISS delivers a better fat-burning moment in the end. The good thing about HIIT is that it burns fat during and after the exercises. HIIT also gets the upper hand when it comes to the athletic performance. It helps to promote muscle gain and even retention. The major negative issue about the HIIT workout is that you are more prone to injury than LISS workouts. Bottom line, each cardio workout is effective and suitable at some point. It’s all about considering the time availability, skills, and your workout goals.

 

Source:

 

https://massivejoes.com/articles/the-scoop/hiit-cardio-or-liss-maximising-fat-loss-and-preserving-muscle

http://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/fitness/workouts/whats-better-hiit-or-liss-training/news-story/cebf7de3d8f038ca3793900b0d80e8aa

https://www.paleofx.com/truth-about-fat-loss/

This was a guest post by Douglass Hameldon. CEO/Editor in Chief of FitnessPurity®.

 

Hi, I’m Doug. My job is to help people reach their fitness goals with easy-to-follow guides, and to overcome any obstacles along the way. Visit my site for more information.

 

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The Plank: A Barefoot Runner’s Best Friend

Written By Barefoot Dawsy

When learning to run barefoot, most newbies tend to focus on their feet and lower limbs (rightfully so). There’s a heap to learn in this area, and doing it this way is a necessity. Once you’ve progressed beyond the basics and start seeing the distances you run increase, it’s time to shift to other parts of your body.

One of the most important non-leg areas that needs attention is your core. Your core is the base from which you can derive strength and endurance, and without it, your running may plateau and even falter early in the game. The secret to getting around this is to add exercises that will strengthen your core, yet not interfere with your running training. An ideal exercise for this is the Plank.

Planks are a deceptively simple exercise that work your entire core, as well as your legs and upper body. They involve lying face-down on the floor then raising your upper body up onto your elbows and your lower body onto your toes. Everything in between should be rigid and stiff as a board. The first time you do it, you may find yourself unable to hold the position for more than a few seconds. This is fine, and we’ve all been there. Keep at it, and you’ll see your times and your core strength increase before you know it.

One great way to add in planks to your routine is to join #PlankADay on Twitter. It’s a very simple program where (you guessed it) you do a plank a day. Post your times to Twitter with the #PlankADay hash tag, and join the hundreds of runners out there who are already benefitting from the program.

Good luck, and happy planking!